Artistcellar Blog

Imagine. Create. Enjoy.

"Art is making something out of nothing and selling it." - Frank Zappa

I always smile when I read this Zappa quote. When I was in Art School, as much as our instructors encouraged following our creative voice, they equally stressed the importance of sales. After all, a starving artist in a garret sounds romantic, but creativity has a difficult time thriving when you’re faced with a lack of income.

I have been working on a series of Prayer Flags using the Artistcellar Tibet Series for inspiration. They will be on exhibit at WITF-TV, our local PBS channel in Harrisburg, PA. This is my second set. The first sold at an exhibition last year. Although the new set is in the spirit of the old, I found my colour choices and positions of the stencils were evolving. As you use your Artistcellar stencils you too will discover how they inspire your work. When masking a stencil here or there, you can change the feel of your design, always creating something fresh and new.

Recently a friend gifted me with a beautifully wrapped wind chime. The deep purple tissue paper she used has a wonderful sheen and light texture. I knew it would find its way into my art. While working on the flags, I found it hard to just wash all the luscious paint off my stencils. Instead, in celebration of Earth Day, I used my purple tissue as a blotter. What better way to “Reuse & Recycle”?

When I was finished stenciling my flag, I transferred the paint to the paper. The tissue took the acrylics well and soon I had two gorgeous paint covered sheets. But this is just the beginning. The paper will be a central part of a project I will write about in the coming weeks.

Have you ever tried using up your paint on paper this way? Not only “saving” your acrylic it’s a great way to extend the life of your stencil…to have positive and negative images at your fingertips.

I suppose Frank Zappa was right. As artists we can make something from nothing.  And here’s hoping you have future sales to boot!

 MATERIALS USED: 

Hello again!

Today we're making stardust. I hope you enjoy the video I have prepared for you...

"Well nevermind we are ugly but we have the music" - Leonard Cohen.

 

Supplies Used:

My brain is rapidly slowing down as SPRING BREAK approaches and I fear I will fall over as I teach Kinders the wonders of Still Lifes in the few days left before sweet freedom(!) and road trips(!!) arrive. Is that how you are feeling too, my fellow creatives? It is during these times where I need a simple project to rock my world and give my creativity a boost towards ACTUALLY MAKING THINGS. I explain all this to you to set the scene for a recent discovery of mine.

In my quest to use stencils in ways different from my usual, I stumbled upon an awesome texture technique that I am convinced someone has already discovered. Since I don't see it taking the crafty blogiverse by storm I must deduce that that someone lacked the proper publicity skillz to get this out into the world where it can grow and marry and make beautiful texture babies. 

Ahem.

So I will step forth and do what needs to be done. Listen carefully....

Grab your art journal, a brayer, some Dina Wakley acrylics, a paint palette, Golden Acrylic glazing liquid and some rad stencils. The ones I used here are Artistcellar's Sacred Geometry 2 and the Old World Maps Series.

Squeeze a little bit of paint and glazing liquid onto the palette and use your brayer to mix it up and smooth it out. When your brayer is evenly inked grab a stencil and carefully roll the brayer over it once or twice. Now, lay aside your stencil and roll your brayer onto a blank page in your art journal. 

TA-DAAAA!

With some of the ink transferring onto the stencil and off of the brayer it is like monoprinting where the brayer is your plate. HAVE I BLOWN YOUR MIND YET? 

And using a dark color onto a pre-painted surface is just divine. Check out this teal background with texture applied with Dina's Night acrylic paint rolled on with a brayer. YUM!

The results are random and depends on how many times you roll your brayer onto the stencil. Want a clear pattern? Only roll your brayer one revolution over your stencil. Want more "layers"? Roll a few times onto your stencil in two different places.

I am not sure if my excitement over this little texture tidbit is a result of my tired educator mind or the thrill of Spring in the air but I can assure you that it is fun and gives mad texture with very little effort. So, go ahead and try it out and let me know what you think. 

Go forth and create, my friends!