Artistcellar Blog

Imagine. Create. Enjoy.

“Postman’s bag is always heavy because it carries the life itself: It carries all the sorrows and all the joys, all the worries and all the hopes!”― Mehmet Murat ildan

Have you ever waited for the postman to arrive? I am sure you have, if you are like me. And do you ever wonder what is in their mailbag? Of course there are bills, and junk mail, which can be a treasure trove for collage artists. But do you ever wonder about the other mail…the messages of delight or passion or longing? And is there still room for them in the age of texts and email?

I recently received a nice collection of acrylics from Artistcellar. They were new to me and I couldn’t wait to give them a go. The Dylusion Paint series is blendable and quick drying, manufactured with journaling in mind. The colours are vivid in the wide mouth tubs. I wondered if they would keep this wonderful quality once applied to my substrate.

I decided to work on illustration board. Rather than prep with gesso, I simply lightly sanded the surface and applied the Squeezed Orange Paint. Coverage was quick and easy, although it didn’t dry quite as fast as I thought it would. But sure enough, the orange kept its vibrant glow after drying. I next stenciled with Quasi from the Artistcellar Quasicrystals Series using the Dylusion Spray in Bubble Gum Pink. Although you can still see the stencil if you look closely, the Paint absorbed the colour. Not what I had in mind for this project, but a finish to keep in mind for the future.

I wanted to put the rest of the colours through their paces, so I sponged them randomly through my Diamond stencil. With the open stencil area it was easy to see how they performed. Again, as with the Squeezed Orange paint, I am pleased to say Vibrant Turquoise, Fresh Lime, and London Blue were easy to work with and held the brilliant colour you can see in the tubs…even after layering paint on paint.

With the background finished I continued by attaching a vintage photo I found in an old magazine. The postage stamps and Priority label just seemed to fit so well with our postman. I found a rubber stamp with beautiful calligraphy. Could the message on the stamp be from a letter in his mailbag? Why not? I inked the stamp with Vibrant Turquoise Paint and stamped on to very fine tissue paper, then attached with matte medium to the board. The final touch was to stencil the Infra image in gold.

Maybe I’m just a hopeless romantic, but seeing the postman with his mailbag does pull at the heart strings. And yes, I believe there is a place for "real" mail in the age of texts and email. My question is this: Is there someone who would love receiving a real letter from you? And would decorating it with your stunning art bring joy to you both? Many believe that letters mingle souls. I know I do.

MATERIALS USED:

I don’t know about you, but sometimes I purchase a craft supply, because I know it’s cool, but there it sits in my studio. Has this ever happened to you?

Well, today, I am busting out one of those said craft items. It’s the Blue Moldable Foam Block or Blue Moldable Stamp.

As an expressive artist who loves stencils and mark making, having a surface to mold into a unique stamp is exciting!

I have chosen to use the Quasicrystals series stencils for this example.

This process is really as easy as 1-2-3! The directions are included with the Moldable Foam Stamp.

  • Heat the surface of the blue block for 30-40 seconds. (I used the Ranger Heat It Craft Tool, and that worked great!)
  • Push the block onto a textured surface for 15-20 seconds.
  • Ink and stamp! (I used StazOn ink.)

You can heat each side of the blue block to get two-stamps-in-one. For side one, I used the Quasi stencil. For side two, I used the Infra stencil

I am envisioning how fun it would be to make giftwrap or art journal backgrounds with these stamps! How might you use the Blue Moldable Stamp and artistcellar stencils?

Are you tired of the impression you have on the Blue Moldable Stamp? No problem! Simply heat it again and repeat the process with something new! Hmmm, manhole covers might be neat, but you’d have to carry an extension cord and your Heat It Craft Tool with you! I am sure there are plenty of things around your home or in your art arsenal that would create lovely textures. Give it a try! Tell us about your experiments in the comments below or on the Artistcellar Facebook Page.

Thanks for playing along!

For more art ideas and mixed media art inspiration, visit me over at OrangeSpiralArts.com

Blessings to you,

Briana

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Hello Wonderful People,

When your heart is heavy or broken, turning to art is proven to be useful. Today, I turn to an altered book I started years ago.

Step One: Find a dark magazine page, a piece of sandpaper, and an interesting stencil from artistcellar.

I am using “Sea Fan” from the Coral Series. (Pictured below)

Place the stencil under the magazine page and rub with the sandpaper until you see the design coming through.

Step Two: Choose an existing book to work in.

Step Three: Tear up your magazine page and glue it down on your page spread with matte medium.

Step Four: Add some marks and scribbles. I used a Carbon Black Lumber Crayon by Dixon.

Step Five: Choose another stencil by artistcellar, (Infra stencil from the Quasicrystal Series) and place it under your book pages. Use the Lumber Crayon to create texture.

Below is a close-up of the texture that comes from the stencil, as well as scribbling over slightly damp magazine page (from the fluid matte medium).

Step Six: Add some color using acrylic paints.

Step Seven: Add a contrasting color. Pictured below, I am using a Crayola Dry-Erase Crayon in orange.

Step Eight: Use a black pen and a white paint pen to add lettering. Pictured below, “Let us have vision for a new way in the new day.”

There you have it, eight easy steps for creative expression and tending to your heart.

Sending Many Blessings Out to You!

-Briana

PS I’d love for you to visit me at OrangeSpiralArts.com

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