Artistcellar Blog

Imagine. Create. Enjoy.

The new Quilt Series stencils have been a source of great inspiration for me. After my last project, where I worked with paint in my art journal, I decided to get my SEW on and grabbed some fabric and embroidery thread. Since I am more of a tortoise than a hare when it comes to hand sewing (okay okay, really ANY sewing) I am only sharing the first half of the project this week. 

Here's what I used:

First step was painting my canvas. I sprayed my canvas with water so when I brushed on the paint it would apply smoothly and blend well. I also made sure I used a wet brush and brushed the paint on the canvas with circular motions. I was going for a wash of color as opposed to thick layers because I wanted to fabric to stay pliable.

When the canvas was dry I placed my two stencils down and did a layer of gesso and then, when dry, a layer of Penny.

Now comes the sewing!! So far I have chosen a variegated embroidery thread and sewed around the edges of the stencil with a back stitch. When I add more stitches I'll be thinking about what I would add if this was a drawing or painting. My needle and thread will act as my pencil or paintbrush. I am enjoying the handiwork and I find myself relaxing as I work. It's nice to unplug, slow down and make progress stitch by stitch.

 

Will it be a book cover? A wall hanging? Check back next time to find out!

Happy creating!

Hello my Lovely Lovelies!!! I am so excited to share today's arty fun with you! I actually created this piece on March 16, which is my Birthday! Yay me! Lol! I also am getting to share how I used the new Artistcellar Quilt series stencils

As soon as I saw these beautiful stencils I knew immediately that I wanted to create something that incorporated my family history. I have an AMAZING family and these stencils reminded me of a speech my Auntie made about how quilts helped aid runaway slaves to safety and freedom. My family is of (MUCH) mixed ancestry and are known as the Cheyenne Valley settlers. They were one of a few integrated communities that lived peacefully without prejudice with integrated schools, churches, and helped each other in times of need. Also one of my Ancestors was know for the round barns that can be found all around the area. My family history on my paternal side is fascinating! If you would like to read more you can search for Cheyenne Valley Settlers Wisconsin. 

I love that I created this piece about my history on my birthday, it grounds me, and once again makes me realize how lucky I am to have been raised within a family that didn't judge based on skin color. I still have a hard time comprehending how people can do that. 

To create this piece I used both the Mini Quilt Pocket stencils and the 6 x 6 Quilt series stencils, I painted the a brick round barn with some simplified Wisconsin scenery in the background using my Koi Watercolor field kit on Strathmore Coldpress watercolor paper. I decided to use the 6x6's to create some fun quilt shapes in the sky. I then used the pocket stencils to put quilts hanging out on the line to dry. For the last step I used my White Gel pen to add some bright white contrast throughout the piece!

I am so happy with how this turned out! I would have liked it without the use of the new stencils, but the stencils made the whole piece feel more homie and they add just that little bit of detail the bumps it up from like to love!

Big Hugs and Mushies to you!

Shana Banana

P.S. I do not have the video completed yet (its my birthday! I'm gonna go play some bingo!) but hope to get it completed soon!

DIE GOLDENE MEDINA - HER DREAMS

“Beds, three tiers high, were still not sufficient to accommodate the 5,000 immigrants who arrived daily. Many, like this young woman, were forced to sleep on benches, chairs, or on the floor.” – Lewis W. Hine

When traveling, have you ever felt bone-weary…so tired you feared the next step? Have you ever been stranded in an airport, with nothing but what seemed like unending hours until the next flight? I have. And if you are like me, I am sure all you could think of was getting somewhere, anywhere, to sleep. To lessen the discomfort of my situation, I like to visualize of my cozy bed at home, covered with a warm, colorful quilt.

My inspiration for this collage was a photograph from the Hine Collection. As an educator, Lewis W. Hine encouraged his students to use photography as a tool for social change. He often held his sociology classes at Ellis Island. In five years, 1904 to 1909, he produced 200 photographs of the immigrants passing through the Island. The young woman trying her best to get some sleep is one I thought fit perfectly with the new Artistcellar Quilt Stencils.

The new series features four quilt designs: The Bear Claw, The Star Flower, and the two I chose to use, The Ohio Star and the Amish Star. Living close to Lancaster, PA it’s nice to see the Amish star included in the series.

Going back to my Strathmore Journal, I sponged on layers of acrylic paint, letting each dry between applications. Having the stencils in both the 6” x 6” and Pocket size is really useful. In my work, I used both. Again, the quality of the stencils didn’t let me down. Even though the paint was dry between multiple layers, clean up was a snap, with each stencil back to immaculate condition. I built the background quilt layer by tiling the image as on a true cloth covering.

Completing the collage, I drew upon my collection of ephemera. I surrounded the Slavic lady with what I imagine surrounded her: mountains of paperwork as she made her way through the Ellis Island process. 

And was she like you and me, tired and sleepy, dreaming of a familiar place to rest? Did her dreams include quilts and thoughts of home?

MATERIALS USED:

Happy Friday!

Today I'm super excited to do a project with the brand new Quilt series stencils! I have both the 6 x 6 and the pocket set, so I got to work creating a little art journal page with them. 

Now I KNOW I want to experiment with the stencils using them to create artistic quilts, (and how fun would it be to sun dye fabric with Dye-Na-Flow ink?!) but for now I wanted to figure out a way to use the stencils in a totally off the wall way. 

So... I made a lotus!

To begin, I sprayed the art journal page with some Tattered Angels Glimmer Mist in "Verdigris". I just wanted to get some color on the page -- once I sprayed it, I set the book aside and grabbed a loose piece of watercolor paper. I had already used this paper to doodle on, so I turned it over and started spraying the "Star Flower" stencil with Lindy's Stamp Gang spray in "Ponderosa Pines Olive". I gave it a quick dry with the heat gun and then used scissors to cut out the flower petals. 

Then, I used a hot glue gun to glue the petals down and add a stem. I wanted more color on the page, so I used the pocket stencils with Tattered Angels Glimmer Mist in "Tarnished Silver" as well as Dye-Na-Flow in Turquoise and Dylusions spray in "Crushed Grape". I also added some black acrylic for more contrast and a Uniball Signo UM-153 pen to add the quote!

I hope you have fun playing with these new stencils! I am already brimming with ideas, they are so versatile and I haven't seen anything like them before! 

Don't you just love the designs of the new stencils?! I have long admired quilters and the artistry they accomplish with fabric and thread. My husband's maternal grandmother was an accomplished quilter and I remember being amazed and humbled when watching her work and seeing her numerous finished creations. She was an artist through and through.

To me, quilting is very American. I know that quilting was around before our country was formed but history shows us it flourished after the arrival of the English and Dutch settlers. Taking fabric and piecing it together in new ways brings art to a utilitarian item and don't you think it has so much symbolism? A quilt can bring comfort, security and peace. It's texture can be warm and cozy. All the seemingly different fabrics brought together with many little stitches become a finished item that seems filled with history, stories and love.

Another thing that's been on my mind lately is my Dad. He passed a little over 4 years ago. He loved this country and considered himself a patriot. He loved, supported and was ready to defend his COUNTRY. He wanted this land to be a place his posterity could flourish in and be able to feel comfort, security and peace. Now, I'm not going to wax political on you. I just want to share what I created in my art journal this week as I needed to express some positive feelings.

Here are the supplies I used:

  • Ohio Star and Star Flower from the Quilts series stencils (6x6) 
  • Ripples stencil from the Water Series (12x12)
  • Dina Wakley Acrylic Paints
  • Gesso
  • White and Black acrylic paint pens

I started with a page in my journal that already had black and blue paint which I added red to.

I then used the Ohio Star and Star Flower stencils with gesso to create the background. When the gesso dried I added "stitches" with a black acrylic paint pen.

After sketching out where I wanted the face to go I added a layer with blue paint and the Ripples stencil so my face would have a subtle texture behind it.

Using gesso I created an underpainting for my face. When that was dry I built layers with the acrylics to create the face. I wanted both light and dark to show across the face.

A final quilt stencil layer on top of the face and a few words and I am happy with the results. I like how the quilt imagery adds a feeling of comfort and order. The bold quilt pattern contrasts with the painterly quality of the face which is partially hidden in the shadows but is emerging to the light.

I will leave you with this definition:

Patriot (noun)

    1. A person who loves, supports, and defends his or her country and its interests with devotion.
    2. person who regards himself or herself as defender, especially of individual rights, against presumed interference by the federal government.

So, I gave a talk to the Minnesota Contemporary Quilters on Monday, February 27th, 2017. The talk was held at the Minnesota Textile Center.

The topic of my talk was on art journaling. Shortly before I was supposed to give my talk, I received a package from Lisa of artistcellar.  Inside the mailing envelope Lisa sent were the latest artistcellar stencils in the theme of QUILTS! I couldn’t believe it. I have most certainly had quilts on the brain, and this felt like a sign from the universe!

I am excited to share some quilt and textile inspiration with you today to hopefully get your creative juices flowing.

First, here are some of the amazing pieces created by the members of the Minnesota Contemporary Quilters group.

Unfortunately, I don’t have the artists names to give them credit. The only artist I know is the creator of the yellow textile in the upper left. Her name is Peggy Wright.

Here are a few photos I snapped of the journals and books I brought to support my talk on art journaling.

Now onto the BRAND NEW and amazing QUILT SERIES STENCILS from artistcellarThere’s a 6x6 set and a Pocket Stencils set. They work quite nicely together, too. First, I started with a pre-painted background and the 6x6 four-stencil set.

I used the Dylusions Paint and a cosmetic wedge for application.

I chose to use Postbox Red and Bubblegum Pink of the Dylusions Blendable Paint.

Are you ready to see what this looks like on top of my messy painted background?

Oh, how I like the contrast of the hard edges on top of the free flowing paint. How about you?

Now it’s time to try out the Quilt Pocket Stencil set. These are so sweet. I couldn’t help but think of these as “mama” and “baby” stencils.

When you need a little contrast, black paint is usually a good choice, right?

See below for how nicely the two sizes of the Quilt Series stencils play together.

And because quilts make me also think of stitching, I had to add some faux stitching lines for effect. I used the Gelly Roll Moonlight pens by Sakura.

Hopefully you can now see that even if you are an expressive artist like me, these quilt stencils are completely awesome!

I have many ideas for how to use the NEW Quilt Series stencils. One idea is to trace the stencil design on the back of scrapbook paper, cut it out, and then collage a quilt onto paper. Wouldn’t that look fantastic?! You might also try tracing the quilt pattern directly onto fabric, cut out the pieces, and then sew them onto a larger fabric background. Oh, the possibilities. Are your creative juices flowing? Good. I hope you have tons of fun!

Thank you for being here. Also, thank you to the Minnesota Contemporary Quilters group and the Minnesota Textile Center for the inspiration.

Blessings,

Briana of OrangeSpiralArts.com